Success Stories

Success Stories

Labette clinic is seeing a valuable exchange of information through PFAC

Labette Health Physicians Group 2The feedback goes both ways between the Patient and Family Advisory Committee (PFAC) and the Labette Health Physicians Group, according to Missy Beasley. Recently she was invited to present at the PFAC meetings at Labette Health in Parsons, Kansas.

Beasley is the clinic manager of the 25 physician and NPP multi-specialty clinics located in Parsons, St. Paul, Erie, Altamont, Cherryvale and Independence. Her clinic is a member of the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative Practice Transformation Network (PTN). It was one of the first to join, in October 2015. Beasley works with Josh Mosier, PTN Quality Improvement Advisor. Through their work on the PTN improvement measures, particularly patient involvement, Beasley said a PFAC committee was something the hospital-owned clinic had been wanting to set up. She was glad to join the hospital’s group which comprises 11 community patient and family advisors, one Board of Trustee liaison, and five or six hospital employees.

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Finding a simple tool that results in many positive changes

 

SCFCC Drs

Sumner County Family Care Center clinic partners
From Left: Lacie Gregory MD, Stephen Hawks DO, Joel Weigand MD, Steven Scheufler MD, Shana Jarmer MD, (not pictured Larry Anderson MD)

Finding a simple tool that results in many positive changes

Amber Dawson hadn’t been at her new job as Administrator of Sumner County Care Center more than a few days when she ran across an email from Practice Transformation Network advisor Jill Daughhetee.

The Sumner County Care Center in Wellington has 11 providers and 30 employees and is celebrating 40 years of service this year. However, a recent string of turnovers in the administrator position had left the lines of communication down and employee morale down, too. Amber wanted to change that and Jill’s email offered some tools.

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Clinic finances move back into the black thanks to PTN participation

“It was incredible,” said Mary Barrett, office manager of her husband’s family practice in Neodesha, Kansas. After less than three months of work with the Kansas Practice Transition Network (PTN), she has made adjustments that “have been a game changer” in Dr. Bradley Barrett’s clinic.

Kansas PTN Quality Improvement Advisor Jill Daughhetee first met Mary in January and together they performed a Baseline Practice Assessment. “Jill analyzed our strengths and weakness,” Mary said, and candidly added, “we have some weaknesses.” With this list, they got started.

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“Secret Patients” Provide Feedback

Ottawa Family Physicians in Ottawa, Kansas have found an effective tool to get patient feedback.  “It’s just very simple,” said Betty Franklin, administrative assistant. 

Franklin explained that two or three weeks ahead of time, they look through the patient schedule and randomly pick three or four patients.  A staff member calls them and asks if they would be willing to be a “secret patient.”  If they agree, a Patient Satisfaction Survey is mailed to them, along with a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

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Family Health Care Clinic in Lindsborg

Family Health Care Clinic in Lindsborg, Kansas became part of the Compass Practice Transformation Network last year.
 


After completing the Practice Assessment Tool, FHCC found that they weren’t capturing structured data consistently to document the quality care that they were providing as a practice.
 


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Satanta District Hospital Testimonial

“My personal experience with KHC has been instrumental in changing the way we do things here. Through the camaraderie and sharing of ideas and information for making changes we have achieved a team that is always ready to rise to any challenge that is put before us.

Because we are a very small CAH, we need help with designing programs that impact patient care, family involvement and nurse and physician participation, we have found a wonderful resource in KHC. I have called or sent emails whenever we have something that we want to work on.

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Together we're better

Frequently unintentional silos keep team members and co-workers from collaborative work. It happens in many organizations, including health care.  People on different teams, who don’t see one another often or at all, may miss what ought to be obvious chances to work collaboratively.

With a new take on an old adage, making sure the right hand knows what the left hand is doing can make a big difference in providing better patient outcomes, more efficiency and cost savings.

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